Lollapalooza, Berklee sending young Chilean musicians to Spain

Organizers from the iconic alternative music concert team up with the world’s largest independent college of contemporary music to train Chile’s next rock stars. 

Admit it, you never thought we’d be writing about the Lollapalooza in the education section of ThisisChile, did you?
Well, thanks to an agreement between the iconic music festival – which has been rocking out the Chilean capital for the last two years now – and the Berklee College of Music, we’ve all the excuse we need.
That’s because the two musical institutions have jointly launched a new scholarship program, which will send a musician from Chile and one from Brazil to take part in summer programs at the Berklee international campus in Valencia, Spain.
The program will join the Berklee Lollapalooza Endowed Scholarship, a four-year full tuition scholarship which was announced at the 2011 Chicago festival, coinciding with Lollapalooza international launch, with festivals in Santiago, Chile and Sao Paulo, Brazil.
The marriage of education and rock festival is not as strange as it may seem at first glance, given festival founder and Jane’s Addiction frontman, Perry Farrell’s, espoused passion for teaching music.
“Lollapalooza has a strong commitment to music education,” Jeff Dorenfeld, Berklee professor of music business/management told PressZoom, “in fact when we announced the first Berklee scholarship Perry Farrell talked about the importance of music education.”
Under Dorenfeld’s leadership Berklee’s Valencia campus has pioneered musical education initiatives in Spanish and Portuguese speaking countries.
“What better way for us to introduce the Valencia campus to musicians in Latin America than to associate with Lollapalooza, one of the biggest festivals in the world?”
Winners of the inaugural scholarship have already been announced, with Brazil’s Sarah Messias, a 16-year-old multi-instrumentalist and 21-year-old Manuel Torres from Linares, Chile earning the privilege of being their country’s first representatives in the program.
Torres, an electric guitar, piano, and percussion player, who says his influences range from John Petrucci to B.B King, will take classes in the Berklee Groove School.

“I think that I’m going to understand the groove. Also, I hope to get many skills to compose and perform,” Torres said. “Music for me is everything. The possibility of studying it, it’s great – understanding how music is composed, how to interpret it, and many other things; there is nothing better than that. With these tools, you and music become one.”