In India

ProChile sponsors wine tasting event in New Delhi

More and more Indians are drinking wine on a regular basis, with Chilean wines gradually increasing in popularity. The invitation-only evening in the nation’s capital will promote a broader understanding of the diversity and quality of Chile’s wines.

Tuesday, November 09, 2010  
Chilean wine exports: “We see a great potential for development in the Indian market.” Chilean wine exports: “We see a great potential for development in the Indian market.”

On Nov. 10 2010, ProChile, Chile’s foreign trade promotions body, will host an evening of wine tasting at New Delhi’s Hotel Grand to promote Chilean producers in the growing Indian wine market. The event will feature 20 to 30 wines presented by various importers accompanied by Chilean seafood, served in traditional and international preparations.

 

Chilean wines have been gradually increasing their market share amongst Indian wine consumers, particularly in the last five to seven years. In 2004, Chile was the sixth largest supplier of wines for the Indian market rising to the fourth largest in 2008, with nearly 5 percent of the market share.

 

“We see a great potential for development in the Indian market,” says national wine coordinator Paola Vasquez, particularly as India’s population becomes more and more international in its outlook.

 

Amongst the most affordable wines imported into the expensive Indian drinks market, Chilean wines have developed a reputation for value above all else. The November event in New Delhi aims to seize on growing popularity to promote the high quality of imported Chilean wines.

 

Despite its robust 34 percent annual growth since 2004, the Indian wine market presents a unique set of challenges for exporters and consumers - particularly high taxes and complicated storage needs due to extreme temperatures. These factors have often made wine restrictively expensive on the subcontinent and prevented it from achieving popularity on par with beer and whiskey, India’s two most frequently imbibed alcoholic beverages.

 

“Rather than obstacles,” Vasquez says, “We see these challenges as an opportunity for education about storing, serving and paring wines.” Equally important is the opportunity to teach the already wine-savvy population more about the specific virtues of Chilean food and wine.

 

Though wine will be the primary focus of the evening, the event will also help to encourage growth in Indian and Chilean trade relations which are already on the rise. “At ProChile we want people around the world to have a better sense of all Chile’s strengths,” Vasquez says. 

 

Guests at the invitation-only event will include restauranteurs, celebrities and press representatives as well as ambassadors to India from throughout Latin America and most of the world’s primary wine producing nations.

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